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Teach My Blog

Toddler Meal Ideas

According to new research from the University of Iowa, toddlers who squish, smash and throw their food are actually learning as thy play. The study also suggests that these messy eaters may be better, faster learners in the long runThe study asked 72 toddlers to identify nonsolid objects like oatmeal, applesauce and milk. The researchers found that the children who got their hands dirty playing and messing with each substance tended to learn words associated with these goopy items more quickly than those who didn't.

The children who interacted most with the foods by poking, throwing, feeling or eating them were most likely to correctly name and identify them by their texture, researchers said.

Previous research has shown that toddlers can easily identify solid objects like apple or cup but non-solid objects are much more chllenging. Mushy, gooey and liquid substances are trickier to identify, therefore taking more brain power to grasp and name.

The other interesting part of the study revealed that babies and toddlers in high chairs learned quicker. It is believed that when your toddler is comfortable and in a familliar setting, they get messier and thus, learn.

Here are a few non-solid toddler meal ideas that will promote messy eating which, in turn, builds brain power:

1. Soup

2. Oatmeal

3. Mashed Potato

4. Yogurt

5. Applesauce

6. Pudding

Build brain power with non-solid toddler meal ideas in combination with Teach My Toddler, the multi award-winning all-in-one learning kit for toddlers 18 months+. Requiring no screens, the kit has everything to give your toddler a head start and teach the basics. Teach My Toddler is divided into four sections; The Alphabet, Numbers, Shapes and Colors. The teaching tools are fully coordinated to encourage repetition and interaction. Teach My Toddler is designed around the concept of matching, which is a key pre-reading skill!

 

16 Apr, 2014
0

Toddler Meal Ideas

According to new research from the University of Iowa, toddlers who squish, smash and throw their food are actually learning as thy play. The study also suggests that these messy eaters may be better, faster learners in the long runThe study asked 72 toddlers to identify nonsolid objects like oatmeal, applesauce and milk. The researchers found that the children who got their hands dirty playing and messing with each substance tended to learn words associated with these goopy items more quickly than those who didn't.

The children who interacted most with the foods by poking, throwing, feeling or eating them were most likely to correctly name and identify them by their texture, researchers said.

Previous research has shown that toddlers can easily identify solid objects like apple or cup but non-solid objects are much more chllenging. Mushy, gooey and liquid substances are trickier to identify, therefore taking more brain power to grasp and name.

The other interesting part of the study revealed that babies and toddlers in high chairs learned quicker. It is believed that when your toddler is comfortable and in a familliar setting, they get messier and thus, learn.

Here are a few non-solid toddler meal ideas that will promote messy eating which, in turn, builds brain power:

1. Soup

2. Oatmeal

3. Mashed Potato

4. Yogurt

5. Applesauce

6. Pudding

Build brain power with non-solid toddler meal ideas in combination with Teach My Toddler, the multi award-winning all-in-one learning kit for toddlers 18 months+. Requiring no screens, the kit has everything to give your toddler a head start and teach the basics. Teach My Toddler is divided into four sections; The Alphabet, Numbers, Shapes and Colors. The teaching tools are fully coordinated to encourage repetition and interaction. Teach My Toddler is designed around the concept of matching, which is a key pre-reading skill!

 

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Practice Writing Letters.

Along with patience, there are a few easy things to keep in mind when you practice writing letters and numbers with your preschooler. Next time you sit down with your preschooler, keep these 5 tips in mind:

5 Tips To Practice Writing Letters and Numbers

1. Muscles: Build your preschoolers’ hand muscles by encouraging scribbling and coloring. Printing requires new muscles that little ones need to build.

2. Grip - Make an OK sign with your preschooler’s writing hand. Have them grasp the pencil between their thumb and their index finger, resting it on their middle finger

3. Surface - Create a slight slope or slanted writing surface, so your preschooler’s wrist is properly extended.

4. Letters - Be certain your your preschooler has a good knowledge of the alphabet. Knowing and recognizing the shapes of each letter provides a great head start for printing!

5. Names - A great place to start! Your preschooler will already be familiar with their name, so learning to print it should be easy. Once mastered, introduce your name, friends and family names!

Simply keep these 5 tips in mind and with patience and practice, your preschooler can master printing!

Teach My Preschooler Printing offers practice writing letters and numbers. Just 20 minutes a day with the award winning Teach My Preschooler printing tools and your little one can master printing uppercase & lowercase letters as well as numbers to 100! Use the magic drawing board, the print guide and the transparencies together to master the skills and enjoy some fun, educational play. The set has everything you need to give your preschooler’s printing skills a head start! Teach My Preschooler Printing can be purchased separately or as part of the award winning, Teach My Preschooler Learning Kit.

15 Apr, 2014
0

Practice Writing Letters.

Along with patience, there are a few easy things to keep in mind when you practice writing letters and numbers with your preschooler. Next time you sit down with your preschooler, keep these 5 tips in mind:

5 Tips To Practice Writing Letters and Numbers

1. Muscles: Build your preschoolers’ hand muscles by encouraging scribbling and coloring. Printing requires new muscles that little ones need to build.

2. Grip - Make an OK sign with your preschooler’s writing hand. Have them grasp the pencil between their thumb and their index finger, resting it on their middle finger

3. Surface - Create a slight slope or slanted writing surface, so your preschooler’s wrist is properly extended.

4. Letters - Be certain your your preschooler has a good knowledge of the alphabet. Knowing and recognizing the shapes of each letter provides a great head start for printing!

5. Names - A great place to start! Your preschooler will already be familiar with their name, so learning to print it should be easy. Once mastered, introduce your name, friends and family names!

Simply keep these 5 tips in mind and with patience and practice, your preschooler can master printing!

Teach My Preschooler Printing offers practice writing letters and numbers. Just 20 minutes a day with the award winning Teach My Preschooler printing tools and your little one can master printing uppercase & lowercase letters as well as numbers to 100! Use the magic drawing board, the print guide and the transparencies together to master the skills and enjoy some fun, educational play. The set has everything you need to give your preschooler’s printing skills a head start! Teach My Preschooler Printing can be purchased separately or as part of the award winning, Teach My Preschooler Learning Kit.

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Tablets for Toddlers

New research shows that by limiting screen time, both TV and tablets, babies and toddlers can reap benefits like better sleep, academic performance and behavior.

4 Reasons To Limit Tablets for Toddlers and Turn Off the TV

According to What To Expect, here are 4 reasons to limit tablets and TV for babies and toddlers:

1. Babies Learn Best From People

Your baby will learn more from interacting with you and spending one-on-one time together than watching a steady stream of animated characters on the tablet or TV.

2. Babies Do Not Learn From Screens

Studies have shown that, while lights and sounds on the screen will grab your baby or toddler's attention, children learn much more effectively through interaction and focused parent-child time.

3. Say No To Background Noise

Turn the TV off when you are not watching. The TV or screen left on can be distracting for both, adults and little ones. A noise free environment will encourage your little one to engage in tasks and be more attentive.

4. Doctors Discourage Screens

The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly discourages screen time for infants and toddlers. Studies have found a connection between excessive TV viewing and an increased risk of attention problems, obesity and poor school performance. Doctors believe there are better ways to boost your little one's IQ!

Everything in moderation! Limit tablets for toddlers and turn off the TV by interacting with your little one using the award winning, Teach My Toddler Learning Kit.

Teach My Toddler is the multi award-winning all-in-one learning kit for toddlers 18 months+. Requiring no screens, the kit has everything to give your toddler a head start and teach the basics. Teach My Toddler is divided into four sections; The Alphabet, Numbers, Shapes and Colors. The teaching tools are fully coordinated to encourage repetition, interaction and will help limit tablets for toddlers!

10 Apr, 2014
0

Tablets for Toddlers

New research shows that by limiting screen time, both TV and tablets, babies and toddlers can reap benefits like better sleep, academic performance and behavior.

4 Reasons To Limit Tablets for Toddlers and Turn Off the TV

According to What To Expect, here are 4 reasons to limit tablets and TV for babies and toddlers:

1. Babies Learn Best From People

Your baby will learn more from interacting with you and spending one-on-one time together than watching a steady stream of animated characters on the tablet or TV.

2. Babies Do Not Learn From Screens

Studies have shown that, while lights and sounds on the screen will grab your baby or toddler's attention, children learn much more effectively through interaction and focused parent-child time.

3. Say No To Background Noise

Turn the TV off when you are not watching. The TV or screen left on can be distracting for both, adults and little ones. A noise free environment will encourage your little one to engage in tasks and be more attentive.

4. Doctors Discourage Screens

The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly discourages screen time for infants and toddlers. Studies have found a connection between excessive TV viewing and an increased risk of attention problems, obesity and poor school performance. Doctors believe there are better ways to boost your little one's IQ!

Everything in moderation! Limit tablets for toddlers and turn off the TV by interacting with your little one using the award winning, Teach My Toddler Learning Kit.

Teach My Toddler is the multi award-winning all-in-one learning kit for toddlers 18 months+. Requiring no screens, the kit has everything to give your toddler a head start and teach the basics. Teach My Toddler is divided into four sections; The Alphabet, Numbers, Shapes and Colors. The teaching tools are fully coordinated to encourage repetition, interaction and will help limit tablets for toddlers!

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Learning Tools For Kids

Here are 5 simple learning tools for kids to teach the colors:

1. Music: The Rainbow Song is one of my favorite activities to teach children colors. My son and I sang it over and over again. Sing the song and have your little one pick up matching toys, colored paper, flashcards etc.

2. Crafts: Use a pad of colored paper to create your own indoor rainbow. Paints are also a great activity to teach children colors. Paint rainbows and sing the rainbow song!

3. Books: There are many books to practice the colors in the local library and in bookstores. I like ‘A Color Of His Own‘ by Leo Lionni. This book helps little ones understand colors in a unique way, using a chameleon as the main character.

4. Food: Mealtimes are a great time to teach colors. Offer your little one a variety of foods to ensure you cover lots of different colors. Educational, healthy and delicious!

5. Outside – An outdoor scavenger hunt can be fun and educational. Make a list of the basic colors and head outside to find items that match. Keeping searching until all of the colors are checked off the list! Spring flowers can make the hunt simple and colorful!

Key Learning

Learning tools for kids can help with mastering the colors. Kids can learn the basics in no time at all!

Teach My Toddler Colors is full of learning tools for kids. The set includes a fully coordinated book, poster, flashcards and puzzle. Teach My Toddler Colors teaches toddlers 9 common colors through repetition and interaction. Just 20 minutes a day with the award winning Teach My Toddler tools and your toddler can master their colors!

16 Mar, 2014
0

Learning Tools For Kids

Here are 5 simple learning tools for kids to teach the colors:

1. Music: The Rainbow Song is one of my favorite activities to teach children colors. My son and I sang it over and over again. Sing the song and have your little one pick up matching toys, colored paper, flashcards etc.

2. Crafts: Use a pad of colored paper to create your own indoor rainbow. Paints are also a great activity to teach children colors. Paint rainbows and sing the rainbow song!

3. Books: There are many books to practice the colors in the local library and in bookstores. I like ‘A Color Of His Own‘ by Leo Lionni. This book helps little ones understand colors in a unique way, using a chameleon as the main character.

4. Food: Mealtimes are a great time to teach colors. Offer your little one a variety of foods to ensure you cover lots of different colors. Educational, healthy and delicious!

5. Outside – An outdoor scavenger hunt can be fun and educational. Make a list of the basic colors and head outside to find items that match. Keeping searching until all of the colors are checked off the list! Spring flowers can make the hunt simple and colorful!

Key Learning

Learning tools for kids can help with mastering the colors. Kids can learn the basics in no time at all!

Teach My Toddler Colors is full of learning tools for kids. The set includes a fully coordinated book, poster, flashcards and puzzle. Teach My Toddler Colors teaches toddlers 9 common colors through repetition and interaction. Just 20 minutes a day with the award winning Teach My Toddler tools and your toddler can master their colors!

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How to Improve Vocabulary

A recent study from Michigan State University says that vocabulary instruction in the early years is not challenging enough. It does not prepare students for long-term reading success.

The Michigan State University study looked at U.S. Kindergarten Classrooms and found that Kindergartens do not teach enough vocabulary words.

“Vocabulary instruction does not seem to have an important enough place, given how substantial it is for kids’ long-term academic success,” said Tanya Wright, MSU assistant professor of teacher education and lead researcher on the study.

Wright believes in order to improve vocabulary; the words should be more challenging. The words should also be reviewed carefully within different contexts. Wright says more than 10 vocabulary words should be taught and reviewed every week.

She found that most of the words being taught are common words that kids will learn in everyday language. More challenging kindergarten vocabulary words should be taught, for example, “hysterical” could be used instead of “funny.”

How to improve vocabulary in preschoolers:

1.         Exposure preschoolers to new words

2.         Are the words being understood? Constantly check.

3.         Review, Review, Review

Learn how to improve vocabulary with your preschooler using Teach My Preschooler Reading. The set teaches 60 vocabulary words and offers a head start in learning how to read. Teach My Preschooler Reading contains 60 flashcards, 10 readers, a reward tin and a flashcard holder. Just 20 minutes a day with the award winning Teach My Preschooler reading tools and your little one can master letter sounds, reading aloud and 60 vocabulary words.

10 Mar, 2014
0

How to Improve Vocabulary

A recent study from Michigan State University says that vocabulary instruction in the early years is not challenging enough. It does not prepare students for long-term reading success.

The Michigan State University study looked at U.S. Kindergarten Classrooms and found that Kindergartens do not teach enough vocabulary words.

“Vocabulary instruction does not seem to have an important enough place, given how substantial it is for kids’ long-term academic success,” said Tanya Wright, MSU assistant professor of teacher education and lead researcher on the study.

Wright believes in order to improve vocabulary; the words should be more challenging. The words should also be reviewed carefully within different contexts. Wright says more than 10 vocabulary words should be taught and reviewed every week.

She found that most of the words being taught are common words that kids will learn in everyday language. More challenging kindergarten vocabulary words should be taught, for example, “hysterical” could be used instead of “funny.”

How to improve vocabulary in preschoolers:

1.         Exposure preschoolers to new words

2.         Are the words being understood? Constantly check.

3.         Review, Review, Review

Learn how to improve vocabulary with your preschooler using Teach My Preschooler Reading. The set teaches 60 vocabulary words and offers a head start in learning how to read. Teach My Preschooler Reading contains 60 flashcards, 10 readers, a reward tin and a flashcard holder. Just 20 minutes a day with the award winning Teach My Preschooler reading tools and your little one can master letter sounds, reading aloud and 60 vocabulary words.

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